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to retire. he asked pope john paul ii, once not if twice, if he could retire and john paul ii would not let him do that. he wanted to go back to bavaria and live with his brother. he wanted to go back to what he loves which is reading and writing. john paul said no, i need you here. pope john paul ii died and then he became pope. benedict is a far shyer man, he's a gentle man, he's far more than intellectual. he never sucked in the oxygen of the crowd. he at times, ren sant. since he announced his abdication, i have been struck by how much he relieved he looks. he actually ad lib when he got up there. when i looked at his prepared text. heed a lib an aline, people say that the church is declining but i see the church as alive, because that crowd was filled with enthusiasm and energy yesterday. you know, you have seen when he met with some priests here in rome about a week ago, he was supposed to deliver a speech about the second vatican -- vatican ii, he was there at the time, that happened 50 years ago. he said no, i can't do that because of my advanced age. 85 has become his excuse to be
they say and mean both of them. thank you, scalia for testimonying it like it is. nnext pope john paul ii shock happened the catholic church and the rest of the world when he made this announcement this week. >> after examined my conscious before god i came to a certainty my strength due to advanced age are no longer suited to the adequate exercise of the ministry. >> it was a remarkable announcement, first pope in over 600 years to actually step aside instead of leaving the papacy in the point much death. i want to say thank you, pope john paul ii . the reason why, as i would say thanks to your predecessor pope john paul ii. this is it a evangelical and not a catholic who appreciates the firm convictions of the catholic church and popes who decipeded that the purpose of the church is not a mere thermometer reflecting the culture of whatever the world happens to believe in the given moment, but believes that the church is to be the thermostat that can read the culture that is it prevalent in the world, but whose purpose is to adjust the temperature of the culture to what it ought to be .
wanted to retire when he worked for john paul ii, asked him, john 35u8 ii, would not let that happen. he became pope after john paul ii died, but he never seemed to enjoy it the way john paul ii did, who was an actor. benedict is a scholar, a theologian, an intellectual, and today you could see the humility that those who know him very well say have always marked this 85-year-old man. >> certainly describing himself as a pilgrim is really extraordinary, and you get the feeling that the crowd, the audiences were responding to him in an emotional way that they hadn't previously. that i guess it's the moment the history, but also the sadness. i mean, this is a very bittersweet moment. >> well, it's -- it is. that's exactly the way to describe it. you know, it's interesting in st. peters square, they had the big jumbotrons out there, and people were gathered around and were actually silent in st. peters square watching what happened, and the last time i heard that kind of silence in st. peters square it was when they announced the death of john paul ii. you never heard a cell phone go off. y
, he watched as a close advisor and close friend, john paul ii, in his last years as pope, and he saw not only the angst that john paul ii went through during that time of suffering, but he also saw how the vatican works when there's a pope that's not able to at his full capacity to do his job. something he obviously had in mind in the past that he could do it. it's very surprising he did. >>steve: father jonathan are you suggesting that the pope saw pope john paul ii in his declining years and said the people of the catholic community need a pope who's at 100% or as close to it as possible, so if i ever get to that stage i'm going to call it quits, and that's what he's doing? >> you know, it seems that that is a big part of his decision. we know how close he was to john paul ii. keep in mind, though, the pope is not a manager. this is why it's so shocking. the pope is not first and foremost the manager. he's the defender of the faith, protecting or guarding the teaching of the church and of the gospel. so you don't need somebody who is a stellar manager at his full capacity necessari
of pope john paul ii. he was the oldest person to become pontiff in 275 years. benedict xvi was a conservative pope, he strongly opposed to birth control, but he embraced new forms of communication and joined twitter last year. pope benedict faced a string of challenges during his term from sexual abuse scandals involving the members of the clergy to an investigation into money laundering in vatican city. a court convicted his former butler last year of stealing and leaking classified documents that pointed to corruption in the vatican. the pope pardoned him over christmas. it's rare for a pope to resign. pope benedict is the first to quit in nearly 600 years. senior members of the catholic church will now start planning their conclave, the meeting they hold to choose a successor. >>> police in the united states are investigating yet another case of gun violence. pop ben fikt benedict xvi will be one of the most religious thinkers of the age. >> the president says he has warm memories. the meeting drew attention because of the different views on abortion rights. he hopes it
pastor and we got that with john paul who also, by the way had pretty good managerial skills. we got with pope benedict xvi a brilliant mind and ability to teach and preach. now i hear some of my brother cardinals say, but we should also look for somebody with some pretty good managerial skills to bring the roman curia as an agent of evangelization and not to -- so if that means some type of renewal, if that needs some type of attention, so be it. >> reporter: as one cardinal put it to me scott, there's so many things needed in the new pope that it would be almost impossible to find it all in one man, but they do know that they need to deal with the mess that is the roman catholic curia at the moment, the church governance and also the ongoing problem of the sex abuse scandal. that is going to weigh heavily on the new pope scott. >> alan thank you very much. the banner that we see there says pope benedict thank you and we love you. the people that we saw gathering outside the papal apartments in san de maso courtyard are some of the folks who have worked for the p
discussion earlier in the day. the cardinal made this comment. he said, john paul led the church to the end because he was convinced that one doesn't come down from the cross. a lot of people interpreted that as essentially the pope taking the easy way out. he's elderly, he's tired and so he's going to retire. >> i think that would be a bad way to look at this. these are two decisions in conscious made by two men of conscious. john paul ii's decision to live his dying publically was his last great teaching moment and the world responded to that in a remarkable way. benedict xvi thought it wouldn't play out that way and he was not going to hold the stage simply to hold the stage. he was going to make a humble act of acceptance of what he believes is god's will. >> is he making the decision about when the conclave will start? there are a lot of people who will wait the 15 days. normally it would be a period of mourning, but the pope has not died. >> i find this frankly ratherer puzzling myself. i'm told the decision was made by the dean of the college of cardinals and the guy who runs the chu
the new pope to continue that and continue to use worked started by john paul ii. >> i would like a young girl pope coming under than the current one. i would like more forms to get women involved in the church. >> many here believe things have to change, especially to stop the solution catholics from turning their backs on the church. >> for more and are, john, we just heard about the fact that some german catholics are looking for more reform. how is that scene? >> it's a very german phenomenon actually. there is criticism and even hostility toward the catholic church in other countries and far less demands for theological reforms. in upper cook, it is a very on critical atmosphere. >> how likely is it that we will see a non-european? >> it is very suspect. they have not voted along geographic lines. if they had come and the latin americans would not have elected cardinal ratzinger seven years ago. >> western societies seem somewhat removed from the church. where is this going? >> it's a very old institution, isn't it? let me tell you is story. in the beginning of the fifth century, the
for the funeral of john paul back in 2005. that was a funeral and this is a different time in the church. the pope is driving through st. peter's square to wave to the faithful. he will have another meeting with cardinals in the morning. he will be speaking to his -- to the people that will select a successor. this is the last time that the pope will have such direct contact with the people. he is driving around among the crowd. a little earlier, the last speech that he will make in front of the people. many issues, he talked about truth. that is interesting when we consider all the things that have been coming out of the vatican and how many people suspect the pope is standing down because he is not strong enough to get a handle all the things happening within the vatican. let's speak to our resident vatican experts. you're listening to that speech about half an hour ago. what did you think were the most notable passages? >> it is importance -- it is important the weight of the papacy. >> there was one bed where he mentioned the dual role of the -- one bit worried mentions the dual role of the po
. john paul ii had more charisma. >> contra races were coming up -- controversy was coming up. i think he handled them with wisdom. >> the wise are normally the old people. >> time now to return our attention to some other international news. supporters are calling it a revolution, but critics are lashing out at the new eu agreement to cap bonuses. it is aimed at a re-piece of the financial crisis. >> those in favor say it will address public anger about the role played by the banks and the economic meltdown. those against it, notably britain's -- britons, say that it will drive talent out of europe. >> the talks took more than 10 months. negotiators managed to clinch the deal despite opposition from the uk. at present, bankers can receive bonuses of as much as 20 times their basic salary. under the new rules, which can come into effect next year, they could be -- capped at one year's salary. >> most important thing is that banks will be stabilized, that a are better able to withstand the crisis -- that they are better able to withstand the crisis. >> it shows we are implementing what we
, in our lifetime, pope paul the vi was in his 80s and pope john paul ii was 85. it depends. it depends. what the cardinals are looking for, what the cardinals are seeking in someone to take pope benedict's place, in my mind, we watched pope john paul become a grandfather. pope benedict walked out on the world stage as a grandfather, it was a interesting and different experience of his fatherly qualities, as you know, from having met him, the gentle kind way that he had. but, you know, i think that depends on what the college of cardinals is looking for. pope benedict was a teacher and he spent his time teaching and he taught well and with great clarity. so, it is a matter of preference of the college of cardinals and as we believe in the church the working of the holy spirit. >> we will stay in close touch with you, bishop. thank you so much, and thank you for everything that you have done. thanks for inviting me to catholic university, i appreciate it and thank you for coming here to the situation room. >> it was great to be with you, wolf, you take care. god bless. >> a guy with a un
not been the most popular pope. he followed in the footsteps of john paul the ii who was such a global superstar. upon his departure a lot of people are feeling that they didn't really know what they would be missing. they've come to appreciate his cerebral intellect, his kindness, his gentle necessary and we spoke to gregg burke a short while ago, here is what he had to say about today. >> it's sad to see the pope leave saint peters, but on the other hand it's beautiful to see the pope happy and at peace. you can tell he is somebody who has been struggling physically. to think okay i'm not baggy to have all this weight on my shoulders is beautiful. >> gregg of course, one of our colleagues now working at the senior communications adviser for the vatican, very much in tune of what is going on and talked a lot about the serenity the pope is feeling now. there will be a short ceremony with the swiss guards. you may have seen footage of them colorfully dressed. that is the papal protection squad and the pope will board the helicopter to castle gandolfo where he will become pope emeritus a
all been nominated by pope benedict or his predecessor john paul ii. i think there's that sense of a new, fresh start for the church. >> you say that the cardinals in some ways want to distance themselves from the scandals that are surrounding the church but how do they do this when a cardinal like roger mahoney of los angeles is allowed to vote in the conclave for a new pope at the very time he is accused of protecting priests of sexually abused children? >> reporter: yes, well this is of course one of the major scandals that has overshadowed the church in the last 30 years, the last ten years specifically this has come out and i think it's one of the things which they will be very aware of in choosing the new pope it will have to be somebody who is able both to continue to monitor the consequences of that scandal, and at the same time bring a new sense of direction and a new idea of the future of the church to help people heal and kind of move away from that scandal. >> delia gallagher thank you, and we will see you in rome soon. >> a senior white hous
to your predecessor, pope john paul ii, this is one evangelical, not a catholic, who has appreciated the firm convictions of the catholic church and the popes who decided the purpose of church was not to be a mere thermometer reflecting the culture of whatever the world happens to believe in a given moment, but rather believes that the church is to be the thermostat that can lead the culture that is prevalent in the world, but whose purpose is to adjust the temperature of the culture to what it ought to be. and for that, i say thank you for faithful service to the bible and to the traditions of god's people. that's a good thing. well, scientists say that the meteor that streaked across the sky on russia friday morning exploded with the force equivalent to the power of an atomic bomb. maybe the shock of the blast, not the leader of the liberal democratic party of russia completely silly. he said those aren't meteorites falling, it's the americans trying out a new weapon. (laughter) >> really? i think he must think we have a great big bubble gum machine we're going to fire on russia n
a letter to pope john paul the second from one victim. the reams of material detailed that then-archbishop roger mahoney went to great lengths to shield priests accused of abuse. in one case, diocesan officials wrote to mahoney that a priest who acknowledged abusing young boys should be re-assigned, instead of getting therapy. "if he were to mention his problem with child abuse," the letter said, "it would put the therapist in the position of having to report him. he cannot mention his past problem." in a handwritten note, mahoney agreed, saying, "sounds good. please proceed!" some of the victims, including manuel vega said the cover-up is now clear for all to see. >> there are smells, there are touches, there are feelings; you have to put yourself into that moment to understand what the catholic church is protecting. this is what cardinal mahony, this is what bishop curry, this is what vicars of clergy, nuns, attorneys; this is what they all got together and spoke about and in secret made these deals to protect these priests. >> suarez: mahoney retired in 2011, to be succeeded
john paul ii back in 1981 said he was following orders from iran's. >> the weapons were from a group that called for an end to the u.s. military presence found on a vessel intercepted in january. >> he was observed operating erratically and low in the water. so a routine boarding was conducted. arms were discovered. we had crew statements that indicated the point of origin was iran. >> beyond yemen, a new british report concludes iran has been expanding its footprint in africa by secretly supplying unmarked ammunition like the shipment uncovered in lagos in 2010 to fuel regional conflicts. the report describes iran's role in the sudan as sustained and potentially escalating. fox news is told that an israeli strike on the sudanese warehouse in objecting was linked to the iran smuggling operation. the head of the house intelligence committee who receives regular briefings on iran. >> it's to escalate arms flow. why, they're feeling the pressure of sanctions. >> while tehran denies involvement, this week authorities link last summer's bus bombing that killed 5 aisraelfiveisraeli tourist
all been worked out by a decree that pope john paul ii came up with maybe three years before he died, and the critical moment which is sort of an answer to your question. the criminal moment is when each cardinal has the ballot in his hands, and before he puts it in the urn, he has to repeat an oath, and you're standing in front of michelangelo's last judgment, so that wall adds always to the deal. you have this in your hand. you say something like this. i can't translate it exactly from latin. you call upon the lord jesus, my savior, as my witness. he who will judge me. you are looking at the -- he who will judge me that the man i am voting for is the one who under god i believe god wants to be pope. in a certain sense it makes it not any more an election. it makes it a discernment. you are trying to figure out what you think god would want. what man you think god would want for all the needs of the church today. it's a fascinating moment. you do it every time you vote, so it's something -- you never can forget. >> well, i never knew that before. you bring this new information that
know it is papacy a bone-crushing burden. if you want proof of that, look at the toll it took on john paul ii and how his final months played out. look at the fact that benedict xvi has confessed to the world that it was too much for him to go on. that said, there's certainly tensions among the cardinals about what the core issues are facing the church and who the right man would be to lead the church forward. there are different currents, different scoots of thought and the clash between those currents is playing out in ways large and small. you can see this in the interviews, for example, cardinals are giving in these days. some of them are saying somewhat contrasting things. some are talking about the need for a missionary pope who can be a salesman for the church. others are talking about the need for a stronger governor. some are talking about the desirability of a pope from the developing world. others are talking about the need to make sure you have someone who can engage secularisim in the west. so it's playing out in that arena. even more and in a fashion that's even more fra
tradition has yet to catch fire. an effort begun by benedict's much loved predecessor, pope john paul ii. mind you any comparison between benedict and celebrity pope is invidious. a point made by fair-minded editorial writers. sex abuse scandal in church, involving homosexual priests continue to march catholic teaching and carries with it a whiff of sulfur. pope paul the vi a warned satan had earned the temple of god. working to eradicate the stain of abuse and apologizing publicly to victims and their families. in a move long overdo he recently fired the morally challenged cardinal roger mahoney of the los angeles diocese. it must be said, however, that while the church enemies have warmed to the scandal, too often catholics and n name only have used it as an excuse to ignore the teachings of the faith they long abandoned. and benedict's rest anything says the authority of the church is ambiguous. speculation runs high who will lead more than a billion catholics. although a fruitless guessing game often fueled by conspiracy theories. whoever is chosen will face grave sin. just last week
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
. >> here is the millionaire question of the day. where did paul mccartney and john lennon first meet? stay tuned for the answer when we come back. >> welcome back. the answer to the millionaire question of the day is in a church. joining me now is francis salazar from patchogue, new york. nice to see you, francis. >> great to be here. meredith: special ed teacher. >> thank you. meredith: brought along your beautiful wife terry who's in the audience. nice to see terry. and the big news here is that the two of you are expecting a baby, which is very exciting. so we got to start sprucing up the nursery. gotta start sprucing up that nursery. >> absolutely. that's what we're hoping for. meredith: well, i hope so, too, and a cruise wouldn't be bad either. >> ha ha. yeah. absolutely. meredith: so let's take a look at the money in your round 1. computer, please randomize the money and the questions. now let's see where your disney cruise question is. oh, way down low. whoa. all right, francis, are you ready? >> i am ready. meredith: then let's play "millionaire." [cheering] according to a 2011 stu
for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton, where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaking on the panel with him befor
website, great minds, like jane, richard, bill moyers and supreme court justice, john paul stevens. go to our website at progressiveforumhouston.org. that's progressiveforumhouston.org. we're pleased to give a book to every attendee tonight. just show your ticket at the distribution table at the grand foyer. additional books are also on sale in the grand foyer by the blue bell la book shop. after the presentation, she'll join me for a q&a. i should say that supreme court rules don't allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present, or future, but we will delve deeply into our fascinating story. justice society my your greets fans in the foy -- foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world," and i also laughed. it is a good book. it will be a best story and required reading in high school and colleges. i'm amazed at the e-mails we've been getting from houston students filled with exclamation points. young people connect with sonya society my your. in her book, i was especially impressed by the scene of sonya and her brother, junior, as kids doing homework with their mother who was al
was very much like a battlefield, it's made a huge difference. in east philly john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> police used to come to this school. used to be on lockdown. >> fight like these captured from a cell phone from the nearby middle school were common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors. jones jail. >> but last september eighth grader tre'von williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and facelift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models, who believe in education and believe in youth development, and people that had a commitment really to america, and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67 (some duplicates have been removed)